News

28 Aug: CCPA, California’s New Privacy Law

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Ever since GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) revolutionized the conversations of everyone with digital advertising interests in the EU, companies in the US have had to make a decision. Withdraw from the EU, make preparations to be compliant, or follow suit and apply a similar standard in the US. CCPA is California’s approach to privacy and consumer data. With the industry evolving at its rapid rate and the introduction to new systems and processes, there is a need in the industry for regulations that enforce best practices. Privacy and how consumer data is currently being processed within different parties has become one of the biggest concerns, especially since the Cambridge Analytica scandal. In this article, you will learn more about what CCPA is, how it works, who it applies to, and what you may need to do in order to be compliant.

23 Jul: The digital advertising world after the third-party cookies’ collapse

Advertising after third-party cookies

In these uncertain times, Google made its stance on third-party cookies very clear. The announcement was made in February 2020 to phase out the use of third-party cookies within the Chrome browser by 2022. This brings Google Chrome, by far the world’s most popular internet browser used by about 63% of internet users across mobile and desktop, up to speed with Apple Safari and Mozilla Firefox, which represent about 19%. After both GDPR and CCPA forced publishers to rethink consent, the cookie is now a key issue. Privacy concerns have been the biggest driver for change within the industry, now the battle is around anonymity and what that really means. To clarify, the commodity here is internet users’ cookie IDs. Let’s look at what the future of the cookie looks like and what this means for publishers and advertisers.

10 Jul: Google’s Revenue Share Unveiled

Google's revenue share revealed

Recently, facing pressure from regulators, Google finally unveiled its buy-side and sell-side pricing policies. The numbers were shared in two separate blog posts, detailing the cut the company takes from both publishers and advertisers when transactions occur within its ecosystem. Fees across google’s ecosystem It’s no secret that Google charges the vast majority of advertisers based on their objectives (cost-per-action – e.g. a click, filling out a form, etc.). Publishers on the other hand are paid on a CPM basis, which is achieved by evaluating the potential of each impression and then converting it into a bid. Essentially, Google’s algorithm determines how likely it is for a particular impression (user) to meet the advertiser’s objective, and then assigns a CPM price to it. Obviously, there’s a lot of “converting” happening on the backend and results vary all the time. On average, however, Google says that publishers receive 69% of what advertisers pay for programmatic ads. How is that broken down? Here’s an example of how $100 ad dollars are distributed within the ecosystem: Google Ads charges advertisers 14%, which leaves us with $86. Then, Google Ad Manager takes a further 20% cut from publishers ($17), leaving them with $69. Source: Google Ad Manager When it comes to Display & Video 360 (Google’s enterprise solution for big brands), the end result is exactly the same, but on average, advertisers pay $13, while $18 are taken from the publisher’s side. There’s one thing in the blog post though that definitely catches your…

13 Apr: How to fight declining ad revenue in 2020 as a publisher.

2020 publisher ad revenue decline

The advertising world is in a lot of trouble right now, due to the global pandemic taking a heavy toll on the economy. With marketing budgets being pulled back and some businesses even shutting down altogether, ad spend is at a low that’s unnatural for this time of the year. But wait, there is some good news in all this. Just because the market is down, it doesn’t mean there’s nothing you can do as a publisher to recover some lost revenue. Over the past month we’ve been hard at work to come up with a response to the crisis and this is what we found.

31 Mar: Company Update (COVID-19)

Company-Update

2020 has been a tough year so far, to say the least, and with this outbreak upon us it seems that the worst is not yet behind us. As a company, we firmly believe that in times of crisis, such as this, we have a shared responsibility and should all do our part to overcome the threats before us. Since COVID-19 became an international pandemic, we’ve taken every precaution to make sure we don’t contribute to its spread and have been dedicating efforts to support our communities in any way we can. With this message, we aim to share how our organization has responded to the situation and hopefully influence our affiliates to participate as well.

19 Mar: COVID-19 in digital publishing – analysis and early predictions.

COVID-19 in digital publishing

The coronavirus (or COVID-19) has now become a global threat and has thrown whole nations out of their typical daily lives. While some countries like China and Italy have suffered a significantly harder hit than others, the repercussions of the outbreak are starting to ripple throughout the whole world. Although we’re yet to see how events will unfold in the months to come, it is certain that if things progress the digital advertising industry will not be out of the impact area. Here are our early predictions and analysis of the situation from a publisher’s point of view. 

09 Mar: CMP – What it is and How Does it Work?

Consent Management Platform

Nowadays the digital publishing industry is taking users’ consent more seriously. With the enforcement of GDPR, ePrivacy Directive and, CCPA online businesses had to readjust the way data from internet users is collected, used and stored. It became highly advisable (and in some cases obligatory) for online businesses to adopt a system that is notifying the web consumers and requiring their consent for collecting their data during their visit. This is where a CMP (a.k.a Consent Management Platform) comes to the rescue, especially for large scale digital properties with high volumes of traffic, where the adoption of a far more structured approach is required. 

28 Feb: Firefox switches off third-party tracking cookies

The end of the third-party tracking cookies

Firefox blocks third-party tracking cookies by default to allow users to have more control over the information they are willing to share across the web.  Since 3 September 2019, Enhanced Tracking Protection is automatically turned on by default for all users around the globe as part of the ‘Standard’ setting in the Firefox browser and will block known “third-party tracking cookies” as per the Disconnect list. Firefox’s statement: “We first enabled this default feature for new users in June 2019. As part of this journey, we rigorously tested, refined, and ultimately landed on a new approach to anti-tracking that is core to delivering on our promise of privacy and security as central aspects of your Firefox experience.”