Ad Tech

Google Publisher Tags

Google Publisher Tags Guide: Integration and Implementation

Since the very first ad was placed on a website in 1994, the advertising industry has used a specific Ad Technology to enable the monetisation of websites – the Ad Server. According to Datanyze, Google Ad Manager is the dominant ad server used by websites with a global market share of 33%. In 2018, Google merged DoubleClick for Publishers (DFP) and Google Ad Exchange to create Google Ad Manager. Which brings us nicely onto Google Publisher Tags. This article will explain not only what GPT are but also how they work, how to generate them and the benefits they bring. What are Google Publisher Tags Google Publisher Tag (GPT) is an ad tagging library used for Google Ad Manager (GAM). Google Publisher Tags enable publishers to dynamically build the ad request and display the ad on web pages. With GPT, you can define inventory, initiate and bundle ad requests, and then render the matching demand. How do Google Publisher Tags Work? GPT is used to define your available ad slots. Placing GPT on a page creates a link between the ad server and a user’s browser. When a user visits a page containing GPT, the following happens: A request is made from the user’s browser to the ad server for gpt.js, the tag code built in JavaScript. The JavaScript builds and sends one or more requests to the ad server for ads tagged on the page. The ad server matches the ad units and any key-values contained within the request….

Infinite Scroll vs Load More

Infinite Scroll vs Load More: Comparison

It is vital for websites to understand how they want their users to interact with their content. User Experience (UX), is all about making the way users interact with you as easy and enjoyable as possible. Traditionally websites are presented as pages and each page belongs to a section or category, users click and read pages of content they are interested in, this is known as Pagination. In this instance, all content and ads load when the page is loaded. More recently opportunities to enable users to discover new or related content without leaving the page they are on have become especially prevalent with users consuming content that is image-heavy or viewed on mobile devices. Here we discuss the two main UX techniques websites can use to keep users on the site and enable the discovery of new content while not loading all content at the initial page visit; Infinite Scroll and Load More.

Google's revenue share revealed

Google’s Revenue Share Unveiled

Recently, facing pressure from regulators, Google finally unveiled its buy-side and sell-side pricing policies. The numbers were shared in two separate blog posts, detailing the cut the company takes from both publishers and advertisers when transactions occur within its ecosystem. Fees across google’s ecosystem It’s no secret that Google charges the vast majority of advertisers based on their objectives (cost-per-action – e.g. a click, filling out a form, etc.). Publishers on the other hand are paid on a CPM basis, which is achieved by evaluating the potential of each impression and then converting it into a bid. Essentially, Google’s algorithm determines how likely it is for a particular impression (user) to meet the advertiser’s objective, and then assigns a CPM price to it. Obviously, there’s a lot of “converting” happening on the backend and results vary all the time. On average, however, Google says that publishers receive 69% of what advertisers pay for programmatic ads. How is that broken down? Here’s an example of how $100 ad dollars are distributed within the ecosystem: Google Ads charges advertisers 14%, which leaves us with $86. Then, Google Ad Manager takes a further 20% cut from publishers ($17), leaving them with $69. Source: Google Ad Manager When it comes to Display & Video 360 (Google’s enterprise solution for big brands), the end result is exactly the same, but on average, advertisers pay $13, while $18 are taken from the publisher’s side. There’s one thing in the blog post though that definitely catches your…

AMP Guide for Publishers in 2020

The Ultimate Guide to AMP for Publishers in 2020

The Future of AMP – Further expansion in 2020 It’s business as usual with Google as we approach the end of the year, even though there have been a lot of recent changes that have caught everyone in the industry off guard. Looks like user experience is still a top priority for the company going forward, as shown by their latest updates overall. It’s clear that the tech giant is steady on the path to simplify a lot of the mechanics used by digital businesses, aiming to establish good practises and create user-first experiences across the board. In retrospect, perhaps the biggest move in that direction was the release of Accelerated Mobile Pages a few years back. So, with the same trend likely to continue into 2020 and beyond, we thought an updated guide on AMP was due.

Google Auto Ads vs Smart View

Google Auto Ads vs Smart View

What are Ad Sense Auto Ads? AdSense auto ads are a Google feature that uses machine learning to automatically make decisions on ad placement and monetization. Essentially, this enables Google AdSense to inject ads into your site only if the ads are likely to perform well. Auto ads can be used alongside traditional ad placements that you have implemented, so it is not a case of one or the other.

How ad refresh affects viewability

How Ad Refresh Affects Viewability | Smart React

Viewability is a key component of any successful monetization strategy in the context of real-time bidding. With all the industry developments in recent years, it’s importance has magnified even further, forcing publishers to put more emphasis on view frequency. This, however, brings a new challenge for webmasters who are utilizing a mix of different tactics to maximize their profits. Let’s explore one such example and take a deeper look at the relationship between viewability and ad refresh technologies. 

in-stream video ads

What are Instream Video Ads?

Chances are you will have already seen an instream video ad today. This type of advertising is hugely popular and very lucrative, with demand definitely outweighing supply. Instream video ads appear before (pre-roll), during (mid-roll) or after (post-roll) video content. The most familiar example of this type of advertising that you would see in your everyday life is when you watch videos on YouTube. These types of video ads vary in length depending on the device and platform they appear on, from 6 seconds to 1 minute. The standard lengths used in typical instream video ads are 15 or 30 seconds, very much reflecting linear TV advertising. This makes it easier to produce as a TV ad can be converted into an instream video ad to be displayed online on websites. The monetization of instream video ads, as with most other video advertising, is based on a CPM or a CPV pricing model. While you may be familiar with CPM, CPV on the other hand bases the cost around the completed video view as opposed to the impression.

Outstream Video Ads

Outstream Video Ads Unwrapped

Nowadays, web users around the globe largely accept videos as their primary source of information, education, and of course entertainment. Videos are easy to consume, grab people’s attention and perform better than pretty much any other type of advertising or content throughout the entire ecosystem. Not a lot of other formats have been аs successful and video has become an essential part of marketers’ toolkit for branding purposes, driving engagement and expanding their reach across the web. Consequently, that creates great monetization opportunities for publishers, but what about those who aren’t using video as their medium of choice? Luckily there’s an answer. Outstream video allows media owners to cash in on content in pretty much any format.