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Programmatic Direct provides publishers with an automated way to directly sell and/or negotiate their inventory. There are three types of deals within this category: Preferred Deals, Programmatic Guaranteed, and Private Auction. They each have their specifics and are used to meet various seller and/or buyer needs. In this article, we will take a closer look at Preferred Deals, their advantages, and disadvantages, as well as their differences from Programmatic Guaranteed and Private Auctions.  What is a Preferred Deal? Preferred Deals are direct deals within which the publisher agrees to provide exclusive first-look to specific inventory in exchange for a predetermined CPM rate. The terms are negotiated via Google Ad Manager and the price is fixed, no auction takes place. The advertiser is not obligated to buy the impressions, hence the alternative name of this type of deal: “programmatic non-guaranteed”. If the advertiser decides he is not interested in the inventory, it goes to an open or a private auction. The publisher can initiate the negotiations with a single advertiser via single or multiple buyers. He can decide to seal the final deal with one or more of those buyers.    Advantages of Preferred Deals Predictability: Publishers get to select the buyers they negotiate with and set a price for the deal they are comfortable with. In this way, they can make much more precise revenue expectations and plan accordingly.   Security: Having the option to choose the advertisers for this type of deal creates a transparent and secure environment where the risk…

Everything you should know about Google AdSense is one of the few ad tech platforms that still operates under second-price auctions. However, that’s about to change till the end of 2021, as Google recently announced. In this article, we’ll cover what exactly is going to change, why it’s happening, and what it means for publishers. What’s happening? Google will switch AdSense auctions to first-price by the end of the year in order to streamline processes and simplify how buyers purchase your inventory. The move will apply to AdSense for Content, AdSense for Video, and AdSense for Gaming. There will be no changes to AdSense for Shopping and AdSense for Search. First-price auctions are expected to “make it easier for buyers to purchase your ad space sold on AdSense”, as per Google’s announcement. But how exactly do first- and second-price auctions differ? Let’s take a look. First-price vs second-price auctions For quite some time, the most common way that actions for digital inventory worked was the second-price model. With that method, buyers paid whatever the second-highest bid was plus one cent. First-price auctions, on the other hand, mean that the final price would be whatever the highest bid in the auction was. This brings more transparency to the process as the so-called “ad tech tax” cannot be manipulated through the murky fee structure of second-price. Why is Google making the change? AdSense is one of the last remaining platforms to still be utilizing the second-price auction model and it was a…

Back in 2015, Google launched the open-source Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) Project for a faster, open mobile web. In 2018 the project moved to an open governance model and then in 2019, it joined the OpenJS Foundation Incubation Program. Today you can use AMP to build a number of things, including websites, web stories, ads, and email. This article will focus on AMP ads – what they are, their advantages and disadvantages, as well as a few best practices if you decide to give AMP ads a shot.  What are AMP ads? AMPHTML ads, also known as AMP ads, combine the technology of the standard HTML ads with that of AMP. This results in very flexible, fast, light, and safe ads that can be delivered on both AMP and non-AMP pages. AMPHTML ads are created only with predefined HTML, CSS, and JavaScript libraries from the AMP Open Source Project, eliminating the possibility for running obscure JavaScript codes and improving security through auto-verification. Three of the more popular AMP ad formats are carousel (ad with more than one image in a carousel, auto-plays when in view), video parallax (a video displayed on top of a banner, the ad plays only on user click), and lightbox (ad expands only on click, uninterested users get more of the website content in view). Publishers interested in video advertising can serve both in-stream and out-stream video ads in AMP.  Advantages  AMP ads come with multiple advantages. Let’s see what they are, starting with the most…

With programmatic digital advertising on the rise in the last few years, the opportunities for publishers and advertisers alike are getting more and more robust. There are several types of deals that fall under the “Programmatic Direct” deal type: programmatic guaranteed, preferred deals, and private auctions. In this article, we will be unfolding the ins and outs of Programmatic Guaranteed. What is Programmatic Guaranteed? Programmatic Guaranteed is an attractive type of campaign to both publishers and advertisers. The sellers get a guaranteed revenue stream, whereas the buyers lock in the exact audience they want to reach. Both sides get predictable results from the deal and mitigate uncertainty. Programmatic Guaranteed allows publishers to negotiate with a buyer the price and terms for specific inventory that would be reserved only for that buyer at a fixed price. Audience targeting happens through device ID or cookies and advertisers get a very precise match to what they are looking for. The deal includes impression volumes and price, frequency capping, what ad sizes and formats will be used, as well as the campaign timeframe. All of this is coded into the Deal ID and handled fully automatically (this is why Programmatic Guaranteed is often confused with Automated Guaranteed, which, however, does not use Deal ID, but rather displays the ads via an ad server API). For Programmatic Guaranteed to work, publisher and buyer Data Management Platforms (DMPs) need to first sync. This allows advertisers to find the right audience and then offer a guaranteed price…

Google launched AdSense Auto ads back in February 2018. The tool has evolved over the years, offering more control to publishers. Manual placements, on the other hand, have been around for quite a while and many of you may have experience with them. They allow for greater control and provide a wider range of options that allow for full customization according to the publisher’s preferences. However, compared to Auto ads, they call for another level of technical knowledge and experience with setup and optimizations. If you are still wondering which one is a better fit for you, then this article might help you. Hint: it might not be one or the other. Manual placements Manual placements are the regular ads you might already be using in AdSense. Publishers are responsible for placing the AdSense code across their pages, as well as the tags for every ad unit they want to have on those pages. You would first need to select your preferences for the ad, such as format and size, and once you configure all the relevant settings, you should place the script at the specific location on your pages where you want the ad to appear. Pros Full control: with manual placements publishers retain full control over what kind of ads appear on their pages, where these ads will show up, and how they would fit their website design. Better user experience: having full control over the ad setup means publishers can customize the ad experience to match their…

Google AdSense Auto Ads offers a simple and straightforward way to place ads on your website. If you are new to advertising or simply don’t have the time to deal with manual setup and placement of ads, then Auto Ads is a great way to monetize your website. Despite the tool’s simplicity, every now and then it happens that publishers notice no ads appear on their website. If this is the case for you as well, check out five of the most common reasons why your Google AdSense Auto Ads might not be showing. 1. Did you turn off your adblocker? While it may seem obvious, to check if your website displays ads correctly your browser adblocker needs to be off. Too often we forget that tool is working in the background and keep wondering what’s wrong with the setup. Before digging any deeper just quickly check if your ad blocker is on. If that’s not the case, then keep reading to find other possible scenarios where Auto Ads won’t show. 2. Is your site approved already?  To check if you’ve already added your site go to Sites > Overview. The site you want to monetize should be marked with Ready. If the status is Not reviewed you would have the option to Request a review. In case you get the following message “Something went wrong. Please try again later.” carefully check if you entered the correct URL. If the message pops up even after that, it means that your…

WordPress is by far the most popular and widely used website building platform. With thousands of themes to choose from, publishers are faced with a tough choice to make. In this article, we’ll present some of the WordPress themes that are most suitable for publishers who want to maximize profits from AdSense. The themes we chose are all equipped to make ad management a breeze and provide you with versatile options to ensure you make the most out of your ad inventory. AdSense optimized themes focus on getting you higher CTR through strategic ad locations and keeping your audience on-site to boost revenues.  2021 Top AdSense Optimized WordPress Themes For Publishers  Admania Who is it for? This theme was designed to help publishers place ads. That being said, it is great for bloggers, magazines, and news sites alike. It is particularly recommended for affiliate marketers who struggle with banner blindness. Advantages: Live front-end ad editor More than 12 types of ad units Ad blocker detection and support for ad rotation WooCommerce-compatible and translation ready SEO and speed optimized  Price: $59 exclusive on Envato ThemeForest market TrueMag Who is it for? This is a magazine-style WordPress theme, designed for publishers with multiple income streams, such as ads and e-commerce. Advantages: Fully responsive built-in Google AdSense ad units  Flexible widgetized sidebars Professional look with ad spots that blend well with page’s design SEO and mobile-optimized and translation-ready WooCommerce-compatible for those of you running an e-shop Price: $58 by StrictThemes, exclusive on Envato…

Video header bidding has been gaining popularity in recent years and has even become a buzzword in the ad tech world lately. Video ads have great engagement levels and high revenue potential, so it’s only natural that both advertisers and publishers are interested in them. Before header bidding, the programmatic video was being implemented through the old-school waterfall method. With the advancement of technology, however, video header bidding is gradually becoming the norm. Let’s see how it works. What is video header bidding? Video header bidding is the means that publishers use to open up their video ad inventory to multiple demand partners at the same time. The goal is to have a fair auction and increase the competition. Just like header bidding for display ads, video header bidding can be conducted both on the server and on the client-side. Video header bidding is similar to traditional header bidding, but the execution is different. The main distinction in the process stems from the fact that video advertising involves a player. We will now discuss each type of video header bidding to see how they differ. Client-side video header bidding To run header bidding, the publisher has placed a header bidding wrapper in the header of the website. With client-side video header bidding, once an impression is available, the wrapper calls the SSPs/Ad Exchanges and conducts the bidding on the user’s browser, most often after a specified timeout. The winning bid in the auction is then passed to the publisher’s ad…