Simeon Polimenov

23 Dec: Google December 2020 Core Update Rolling Out

Google December 2020 Core Update

On the 3rd of December, Google announced that a new core update is rolling out. This December 2020 core update is the third one this year, the first one was the January 2020 core update and the second one was May 2020 core update. The roll-out  Google said “the December 2020 Core Update is now rolling outlive. As is typical with these updates, it will typically take about one to two weeks to fully roll out.” This was a global update, like all core updates, and was not unique to any area, language, or web site category. It’s a classic “broad-core update” that Google releases every few months or so. In this case, it was the longest stretch since the confirmed large core update, which took just under seven months, as compared to the usual three-month period. This December 2020 update On December 16, Google finished rolling out the Google December 2020 Core Update. As previously mentioned, it began on December 3rd at around 1 pm ET and took 13 days to roll out entirely, which is just about the two-week timeline that Google gave us for the core update rollouts.  Here’s the announcement from Google that it’s rolled out: It was an atypical core update and it seems to be a big and substantial one. We have monitored a huge spike in volatility on a number of sites on December 4th, the day after the update began rolling out. Then another set of fluctuations on the 10th of December,…

02 Dec: Google Publisher Tags Guide: Integration and Implementation

Google Publisher Tags

Since the very first ad was placed on a website in 1994, the advertising industry has used a specific Ad Technology to enable the monetisation of websites – the Ad Server. According to Datanyze, Google Ad Manager is the dominant ad server used by websites with a global market share of 33%. In 2018, Google merged DoubleClick for Publishers (DFP) and Google Ad Exchange to create Google Ad Manager. Which brings us nicely onto Google Publisher Tags. This article will explain not only what GPT are but also how they work, how to generate them and the benefits they bring. What are Google Publisher Tags Google Publisher Tag (GPT) is an ad tagging library used for Google Ad Manager (GAM). Google Publisher Tags enable publishers to dynamically build the ad request and display the ad on web pages. With GPT, you can define inventory, initiate and bundle ad requests, and then render the matching demand. How do Google Publisher Tags Work? GPT is used to define your available ad slots. Placing GPT on a page creates a link between the ad server and a user’s browser. When a user visits a page containing GPT, the following happens: A request is made from the user’s browser to the ad server for gpt.js, the tag code built in JavaScript. The JavaScript builds and sends one or more requests to the ad server for ads tagged on the page. The ad server matches the ad units and any key-values contained within the request….

19 Aug: AdSense Confirmed Click

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What is it? According to Google, a confirmed click is aimed to address a genuine problem everyday people face as they use the internet and their mobile devices. The noble aim is to reduce the effects of ‘unintentional’, ‘accidental’, or even ‘fraudulent’ clicks. After reviewing a publisher site, Google may determine that some aspect of the publisher’s ad strategy is causing accidental clicks on ads and therefore ensure that advertisers do not have to pay for unintentional clicks.

10 Jul: Google’s Revenue Share Unveiled

Google's revenue share revealed

Recently, facing pressure from regulators, Google finally unveiled its buy-side and sell-side pricing policies. The numbers were shared in two separate blog posts, detailing the cut the company takes from both publishers and advertisers when transactions occur within its ecosystem. Fees across google’s ecosystem It’s no secret that Google charges the vast majority of advertisers based on their objectives (cost-per-action – e.g. a click, filling out a form, etc.). Publishers on the other hand are paid on a CPM basis, which is achieved by evaluating the potential of each impression and then converting it into a bid. Essentially, Google’s algorithm determines how likely it is for a particular impression (user) to meet the advertiser’s objective, and then assigns a CPM price to it. Obviously, there’s a lot of “converting” happening on the backend and results vary all the time. On average, however, Google says that publishers receive 69% of what advertisers pay for programmatic ads. How is that broken down? Here’s an example of how $100 ad dollars are distributed within the ecosystem: Google Ads charges advertisers 14%, which leaves us with $86. Then, Google Ad Manager takes a further 20% cut from publishers ($17), leaving them with $69. Source: Google Ad Manager When it comes to Display & Video 360 (Google’s enterprise solution for big brands), the end result is exactly the same, but on average, advertisers pay $13, while $18 are taken from the publisher’s side. There’s one thing in the blog post though that definitely catches your…

15 May: Google Auto Ads vs Smart View

Google Auto Ads vs Smart View

What are Ad Sense Auto Ads? AdSense auto ads are a Google feature that uses machine learning to automatically make decisions on ad placement and monetization. Essentially, this enables Google AdSense to inject ads into your site only if the ads are likely to perform well. Auto ads can be used alongside traditional ad placements that you have implemented, so it is not a case of one or the other.