Jeevan Pathare

Google retires it's link ad units

22 Mar: Google retires its Link Ad units this March

Website monetization starts and ends with Google for many publishers, be it Google Ad Manager or Google AdSense. The difference between the two is the publisher’s level of sophistication to manage multiple demand sources. The vast majority of publishers, therefore, rely on Google AdSense to deliver many of the ads you see on blogs and independent niche websites. That means Link Ad Units appearing amongst the usual display ads.

Page RPM

17 Feb: Page RPM and its importance for publishers

These days there is so much information at our disposal, with metrics for almost everything. Sometimes, there are some metrics that do not just show a picture but also tell a story.  For example, for Students, your GPA (Grade Point Average) shows how good a student you are, for growing businesses your CAC (Customer Acquisition Cost) shows you how much it costs to gain a new customer and grow your business. For Publishers like you, there is Page RPM. What is Page RPM? Page RPM refers to the revenue a publisher would expect to see generated per one thousand page views. RPM is an acronym for Revenue Per Mille, with Mille being the Latin word for a thousand (for those of you thinking back to college that’s why Roman numerals have M for a thousand!).  RPM tells a publisher how much revenue is being generated for each page that is viewed on their website. A publisher can even calculate the Page RPM for individual pages.  How do you calculate it? Before you can calculate Page RPM, you need to know 2 numbers; Total Ad Revenue – how much ad revenue you think you have made Total Page Views – how many times a user views a page The formula used is as follows: Total Ad Revenue / Total Page Views * 1000 Example: If you have 4k page views per month and an estimated ad revenue of $30, your Page RPM would be ($30/4000)*1000 = $7.50 Why it is Important?…

Google's Heavy Ads

28 Sep: Google’s Heavy Ads

Google Chrome is the dominant web browser in the world with a 65% market share against the next best Apple Safari at 16%. Google‘s idea was to build a web browser that was fast and responsive with the best user experience possible. So it is with this in mind along with the Better Ads Standards, that Google has added a default setting live from late August to block ‘Heavy Ads’.

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28 Aug: CCPA, California’s New Privacy Law

Ever since GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) revolutionized the conversations of everyone with digital advertising interests in the EU, companies in the US have had to make a decision. Withdraw from the EU, make preparations to be compliant, or follow suit and apply a similar standard in the US. CCPA is California’s approach to privacy and consumer data. With the industry evolving at its rapid rate and the introduction to new systems and processes, there is a need in the industry for regulations that enforce best practices. Privacy and how consumer data is currently being processed within different parties has become one of the biggest concerns, especially since the Cambridge Analytica scandal. In this article, you will learn more about what CCPA is, how it works, who it applies to, and what you may need to do in order to be compliant.

Maintain Top Tier Ad Quality

28 Aug: 5 Reasons to Maintain Top Tier Ad Quality

“Ad quality is in my top three concerns as a publisher.” How many times do we hear this? Almost always? This has always been a topic of interest. But especially in the current situation, it has been accentuated since there is a gap between supply and demand for inventory. Advertiser buying and spending patterns have changed leading to publishers taking some drastic measures to earn a sustainable revenue. It’s a vicious cycle, dropping floor prices or increasing the available inventory opens the door to another larger problem – Bad ads/ Ad Quality. This should be a concern as it can have serious implications on the business model as a whole. So here is why maintaining top tier ad quality is always a good idea.

Advertising after third-party cookies

23 Jul: The digital advertising world after the third-party cookies’ collapse

In these uncertain times, Google made its stance on third-party cookies very clear. The announcement was made in February 2020 to phase out the use of third-party cookies within the Chrome browser by 2022. This brings Google Chrome, by far the world’s most popular internet browser used by about 63% of internet users across mobile and desktop, up to speed with Apple Safari and Mozilla Firefox, which represent about 19%. After both GDPR and CCPA forced publishers to rethink consent, the cookie is now a key issue. Privacy concerns have been the biggest driver for change within the industry, now the battle is around anonymity and what that really means. To clarify, the commodity here is internet users’ cookie IDs. Let’s look at what the future of the cookie looks like and what this means for publishers and advertisers.